Catching Hay Fever on the Moon

Hi! Welcome to the supporting webpage for the ‘Catching Hay Fever on the Moon‘ talk from the Besti-versity tent at Bestival 2012. If you heard the talk and would like to learn more about manned spaceflight, spacecraft systems engineering or anything else to do with spaceflight, then further details and information can be found here along with other good resources, books and webpages that might be of interest.

If you missed the talk or want to download copies of the presentation (in either Prezi or PowerPoint form) from the Besti-versity tent, then you can do so here:

About Me

This is the blurby bit about me:

I’m Simon. I’m a postgraduate student from the University of Southampton, working in the Astronautics Research Group while working on a PhD project looking at using satellite radar systems to observe turbulence in the upper-layer of the ocean. This page is posted on my personal blog; feel free to have a browse if you’re particularly curious.

I’m currently finishing my third year of PhD study while simultaneously working on various outreach activities (like the University of Southampton Roadshow at Bestival and beyond) and trying to promote the world of ‘space’ to a wider audience. The personal webpage for my PhD project can be found here: Satellite Measurement of Turbulence

If you’ve got any questions about anything I’ve talked about or want to find out more about the sort of work I do, then feel free to e-mail me at sgg303 [at] soton.ac.uk

Space

Space is extraordinary. More extraordinary, however, is the time, effort and expertise of the men and women who design, construct and operate the spacecraft and probes that explore and inhabit the world outside our own. ‘Space’ is still a deeply fascinating environment… the wonderful machines used to transport people and technology into space do not just “leap” into being: human ideas, perspiration and dedication are integral components to the birth of a spacecraft. All that’s required to take up the challenge of being a future spacecraft designer is a passion; you don’t need to be a superhuman to work in the space industry (they let me in, so it can’t be that hard!)

I first got into spacecraft engineering during my undergraduate degree, discovering the fascinating, exciting and groundbreaking work that is pursued in the space industry and its subsidiaries. I was immediately captured by the considerable efforts to place humans in space and keep them there, but also the development of earth observation satellites and instrumentation to observe our planet and its climate response.

Further Reading (with Amazon links)

The following books give a good introduction to the world of manned (and unmanned) spaceflight for budding rocket scientists, astronauts or spacecraft systems engineers without delving into armfuls of mathematics, equations and formulae. If the Besti-versity talk piqued your interest in the world of ‘space’, then these texts come highly recommended.

If you’re considering spaceflight engineering as a career and are interested in designing, constructing, testing or operating spacecraft, then I recommend the following text for getting started on systems engineering of spacecraft:

Degree Courses at the University of Southampton

If you’re interested in studying space systems engineering at University, then follow the following links to the University of Southampton’s degree course webpages.

Other Links

How has the ISS benefitted people on the ground?
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/benefits/index.html

Where is the International Space Station right now?
http://www.isstracker.com/

What happens to the human body in the vacuum of space?
http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi2691.htm

ESA: Effect of spaceflight on the human body:
http://www.esa.int/esaHS/ESAGO90VMOC_astronauts_0.html

Radiation doses in space and effects on human body:
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMYYHUHJCF_index_0.html

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